Filter Attenuation Measurement Method Using Electrical Fast Transient Burst (EFTB) [Part 1 of 3]

At Wurth Electronics, we always strive to provide service that is “more than you expect.” That’s why, when Schneider Electric approached our team about the need to offer more information on electrical fast transient burst (EFTB) attenuation, we jumped at the chance to add value for our customers.

In this three-part blog series, we’ll explain this collaborative effort between Rich Spangenberg from Schneider Electric and Jared Quenzer from Wurth Electronics. We'll introduce the project in this post and dive deeper in the following two posts. (Stay tuned!)

If you’ll be attending APEC 2019 in Anaheim, California, you can learn even more about this topic by attending Jared’s session on Thursday, March 21, at 1:45PM in room 213B or by stopping by our booth to ask us questions about filter attenuation using EFTB (or anything else!).

How the Project Began

This collaborative project between Schneider Electric and Wurth Electronics was launched to study a new filter attenuation measurement method using the electrical fast transient burst (EFTB) signal on common mode chokes (CMCs).

It all began when Rich Spangenberg, a principal technical expert in electromagnetic compatibility at Schneider Electric, discovered some issues when designing a filter for a 24-volt power input circuit. Schneider was trying to filter EFTB from power sources. Rich wanted to filter using a common mode choke for several reasons.

Upon viewing Wurth Electronics’ catalog of common mode chokes, Rich had some questions, so he approached our team about his desire to do some characterization of chokes with EFTB. That prompted the question: How well does a common mode choke reduce an EFTB signal?

Quick to join the discussion was Jared Quenzer, at that time, a Product Development Engineer at Wurth Electronics. Jared now has over five years of experience designing magnetics and many more years of experience measuring electromagnetic interference in our customers’ applications. He now works as an Applications Engineer with a technical emphasis on EMC and Power products.

Rich and Jared began their discussion around the analysis of insertion loss or attenuation. Typically, when a common mode choke is measured, like in Wurth Electronics’ catalogs, it is measured in small signal plots. But Rich wanted to know: What happens when we use a very large signal? How does large-signal attenuation compare to small-signal characterization?

Thus, the project was born.

Testing Attenuation for EFTB per IEC 61000-4-4

Specifically, Rich and Jared wanted to find out what attenuation would look like for an EFTB stimulus according to IEC 61000-4-4 for 1kV and 4kV.

IEC 61000-4-4 describes waveform shape and periodicity, peak voltage levels, test equipment specifications and verification, and application requirements. EFTB is a waveform that can go up to 4,000 volts in five nanoseconds, so it’s a very high rate of change in voltage with respect to time. Compare this to typical “surge” or “impulse” requirements with a risetime of over 1 microsecond.

Do you think a CMC will be able to handle this?

Stay Tuned for More!

Check back with our blog to see the other two posts in this series.

And remember, if you’ll be attending APEC 2019 in Anaheim, California, you can learn even more about this topic by attending Jared’s session on Thursday, March 21, at 1:45PM in room 213B or by stopping by our booth to ask us questions about filter attenuation using EFTB (or anything else!).

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